Tag: psychology

Millionaire Status: Why So Many Men?

By Sarah Fallaw on Oct 19th, 2018 in Books and Publications, Studying the Wealthy

More than anything else, our research findings related to becoming economically successful on our own have more to do with behaviors related to saving, spending, investing, and planning than characteristics that we cannot control, or have little choice over, like how we were raised. We’ve even seen, through the research we’ve conducted at DataPoints, that […]

Career Risks: Now or Later

By Sarah Fallaw on Sep 19th, 2017 in Lessons Learned, Psychology and Careers

In finishing the follow up to The Millionaire Next Door, and specifically in working on the chapter discussing work and careers, there is consistency in the finding that most economically successful individuals must take some sort of risk in their careers. The question is: when an opportunity (risk) is presented, who can take advantage of it? […]

Assessing Black Friday Fitness

By Sarah Fallaw on Nov 23rd, 2016 in Current Events

The frenzy of holiday shopping started over a month ago, culminating with this week’s Black Friday sales, where an estimated 137.4 million people will shop for something. My father had a lot to say about Black Friday shopping, particularly about those who felt it necessary or were compelled to stand in line for hours waiting […]

On the 20th Anniversary of The Millionaire Next Door

By Sarah Fallaw on Oct 20th, 2016 in Books and Publications, Current Events

As we progress through this election cycle I am having a bout of deja vu.  We’ve been here before. Back in 1996 we were watching another election cycle that involved the Clintons–Bill Clinton versus Bob Dole versus Ross Perot.  We were also seeing increased technology addiction (chatting on dial-up ISPs), and feeling as if threats […]

The Handbag Challenge

By Sarah Fallaw on Jun 14th, 2016 in Current Events, Lessons Learned

For many of us, handbags hold our entire lives. My life is held in a six-year-old mom purse, coated on the inside with a thin layer of dried Cheerio powder mixed with applesauce and regularly confused with a punching bag. I have a running joke with my colleagues at Data Points that I’m not buying a new […]

Spending Non-Financial Resources

By Sarah Fallaw on Dec 30th, 2015 in Psychology and Careers

How will you spend your time, emotions, and brainpower in the new year? From becoming emotionally involved in politics to the drama in what neighbors are buying, my father recognized that distractions could be a key source of why many struggle to become financially independent or achieve other goals. He gave us this advice on financial fitness last January: […]

Not Ready for The Real World

By Sarah Fallaw on Aug 6th, 2015 in Psychology and Careers

I know elementary school teachers, coaches, and your parents told you that all that matters is that you do your best. Unfortunately, they all lied to you. The professor who wrote this was responding to a fictional (albeit realistic) scenario: how would you respond to a student who asked for a grade change on a project because she “worked […]

You: The Mentor

By Thomas J. Stanley on May 16th, 2013 in Other

A few weeks ago, readers of my blog and AMI panelists were asked to recount their “ah-ha!” moments as part an ongoing research effort examining wealth building in America. We appreciate the honesty and courage that many of you exhibited in sharing your stories and how they changed your lives. Nearly 250 of you participated […]

Your Ah-ha! Moment

By Thomas J. Stanley on Apr 25th, 2013 in Other

In an earlier blog post, we discussed how career experiences, both successes and failures, can lead to moments of clarity (Working for those Ah-ha! Career Moments, August 2012). This post highlighted the fact that many successful millionaires have a wide range of experiences that help them determine a successful career path. Of course, a life-changing […]

Financial Experiences Courtesy of You

By Thomas J. Stanley on Dec 11th, 2012 in Psychology and Careers

by Sarah S. Fallaw, Ph.D., Director of Research at AMI  In the Just Say No era of the 1980s, there were several memorable public service announcements (PSAs) that aired. None were perhaps as memorable as the one involving a father and son. The son, upon being asked who taught him to use various types of […]